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Cover image for A new way to build games with no coding - CORE

A new way to build games with no coding - CORE

rcarlson profile image Robert Carlson ・1 min read

I found a new game engine last week that might be worth checking out if you are new to game dev. The engine is called CORE (https://www.coregames.com) and it offers an entire eco-system for game development including publishing and a community element.

What I like most about this engine in particular is how accessible it makes game development. CORE already has an active player-base which makes discovering your games a lot easier. There was a time when publishing on steam guaranteed you players, however, with steam becoming over-saturated, developers are having to look for new ways of distributing their games. I think CORE might be that way for some.

The engine is built using Unreal and can be used in an entirely code-less capacity (something most engines are starting to offer), or if you like you can dive into coding using Lua. What I see most people doing here is learning using the code-free option and then slowly progressing to learn coding as their games get more sophisticated.

I plan on creating some more content around this platform to try it out at length. So far this engine looks pretty promising for new game developers though!

https://www.coregames.com/create

Discussion

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ian profile image
Ian

Is game development being accessible a good thing? You might consider this "gatekeeping" perhaps but I believe it can be a bad thing.

There is a lot of crap games, money grabs, filled with mtx, ridiculously priced pre alpha games. Games with no sustinance. What I like about the difficulty of building a game is that you generally get quality. People seem to our more effort into games when it requires more knowledge.

As a start this looks great. But as games become easier to make the quality degrades. Look at websites and how easy you can build them, Wordpress, Wix, Weebly, Squarespace. These are all good tools but I'd argue that they don't make quality websites, most are simply repeated templates.

"Code free" has limitations and sooner or later most people will realise this. I do hope for the best though and that people use this and get to create their dreams.

This comment swings in direction, sorry about that. Just wanted to give a different angle on why it could be bad as you have a great post on how it can be good.

Also your point on steam ia spot on. It has become saturated and I rarely find a game I want to play on there anymore unfortunately

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bbaraga profile image
bbaraga

Yes quality will degrade as more people try to build things but great quality games will always rise to the surface.

Devs / coders tend to think that being able to do the "nuts and bolts" makes them good designers.

If steam is saturated and you rarely find a game, what type of game are you looking for?
I think the conversation needs to be about what makes you want to play a game.

Is there a niche missing? or not updated in a long time?
do you want to make a game for yourself or one that is on trend.

Let's discuss

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cpluta profile image
Chris Pluta

I identify as a dev and generally feel like I can get/develop and understanding of a system to make it do what I want. But when it comes to other aspects I am definitely lacking. Especially in UI/UX... 😁

How do you see quality games rise to the surface?

As for myself I tend to make games for myself. It might not be an original idea, but it's something I want to see or I want to figure out how it works. How about yourself?

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ian profile image
Ian

Quality is very personal. What I see as good doesn't reflect what you may think as good.

Some games don't have a sense of community for example. A forum, a place to chat and post guides, something more than just an in-game chat system. For me that is crucial. I enjoy the social aspect sometimes more than the game itself.

Knowing it's not a one man job is also reassuring. Avoiding the "bus factor". Knowing multiple people are working on a project generally reflects that bugs and such will be fixed within a reasonable time. I know this isn't always possible with indie dev, but both points are something I look out for

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lordofdragons profile image
Plüss Roland

To be honest AAA usually fix bugs less often than Indies because fixing bugs is a "cost factor". Doing fan-service with "DLC"/"IG-Shop" is prefered :rolleyes:

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cpluta profile image
Chris Pluta

So what do you consider a game to be? There are things out there such as Gone Home where the game is the medium to tell the story where you discover how you want to explore the environment.

Now I don't think everyone will treat a game like that, but also where someone might have a deeper understanding of story and art they can bring their vision to life. Then someone can start making plugins (ala Wordpress) to understand how to program.

We see tools like Bolt(Unity) and Blueprint(Unreal) trying to get closer to a more limited code system to help break barriers.

I think the potential of gate keeping might be barring a bunch of creative minds from entering the space and showing us their vision.

I agree with having a more "Wild West" approach, how do you govern quality? I think diving into this question is probably a thread on its own. 😄

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ian profile image
Ian

Not sure what you mean by your first question. I wasn't talking about what a game should be. A game is a game whether it's pacman or Cyberpunk.

Both Unreal and Unity as far as I know both require extension scripting and some programming depending on what your going for. There is no way to make a one fits all solution. Albeit Unity seems to do a good job of trying to achieve this.

You can't govern quality. Steam tried with greenlight and it seemed a catastrophy which is why I think they stopped. There is no barrier to releasing a game. There is a barrier to making intricate games as they require teams or a ton of time or both. No reasonable person can be expected to model, program, make music and story tell. Those people are few and far between

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cpluta profile image
Chris Pluta

I agree with there is rarely a person with all the skills they need. At some point someone needs help to make their vision come true. And really that was the angle where I was aiming at with "what is a game".

In terms of how Unity and Unreal approach the problem is a very bottom-up solution, since they first started with the intent of being an engine that requires programming. Where something like CORE is focused on a top-down solution, so the philosophies between each problem will be fundamentally different.

I do agree with a solution such as CORE we probably will see the same kind of games come out of it and I feel like it may be telling. Such as engines with niche implementations such as RPG Maker and Ren'Py.

I might be coming off cynical here, but when I've tried to get people together to build a game either they are doing it because it's a cool idea but don't quite follow through or they are pushing their own agenda trying to get their game met. So with that, if there is one less thing for someone to focus on more power to them! 💪

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lordofdragons profile image
Plüss Roland

I think both approaches are wrong.

The bottom up approach of Unreal puts too much work and knowledge-to-have on the developer causing troubles with the multitude of techniques existing today combined with multitude of user systems and limitations combined against.

The top-down approach like CORE is the home of asset flippers, copy-cats and notoriously bad games.

The right approach in my opinion is in the middle but that's rarely done. My game engine for example tries to go in the middle and sways one or the other direction depending on the what scripting module you use.

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rcarlson profile image
Robert Carlson Author

Always good perspective :) I think abstracting code away should not be a end-goal, but giving people a way to visualize code using tools can help shift their mind to think in terms of coding.

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rohan profile image
ro

I agree completely

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bbaraga profile image
bbaraga

I will take a look at this, this week.
Does anyone want to work on a project together?
maybe a group of us could find time away from our other projects to build something and have it a showcase of what this type of community can do